19. Nov.

11:00 Visit of the Interactive GDR Museum

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5 thoughts on “19. Nov.

  1. I was pleasanly surprised by how a museum can create a platform for generations to interact. I noticed at least two situations in which young highschool students communicated with people their parents’ or grandparents’ age. Both in a playful state, they managed to not pay attention to the age difference anymore, creating a nice micro-climate.

  2. Do museums have to show it all? Can da have run and still raiar awareness? Does everybody need to “dive” in the remamberence so that the goal is kept? Some questions after yesterday.

  3. The lockers at GDR Museum cost € 1.
    As in all other museums in Berlin.
    Here though when you go to pick up your stuff and you empty it, you don’t get the coin back.
    As it happens in all other museums in Berlin.

    This is a private museum. The deposit is a service and services have to be payed.
    It is coherent.

    The experience offered, appealing, funny and informative, deals with a country (and a system) no more existing in the reality, but just in the dispay.
    ” A State comes and goes” is the title of the first panel.
    “GDR economists were cast in the role of sorcerers. Their work resembled that of alchemists …” explains the panel dedicated to economy.

    The people who founded the museum are also economists.
    But they aren’t sorcerers.
    They know indeed very very well the market(ing) mechanisms.

  4. A museum made in the east for people from the west who want to experience the “DDR way”. Young generation can be a bit confused seeing the “stuff” from the museum and imagining that in the same time, “in another corner of the galaxy”(or just across the border) people were having smartphones and internet.

  5. The GDR museum, even though treating GDR memories on a lighter perspective and mainly on a daily life retrospective, might help us thinking on the role of interactivity in pedagogical approaches towards the past/working with memory. Besides, having been in the refugee strike camp in Kreuzberg, this thought on “one Europe” came back: aren’t we just covering internal conflicts and extending the wall to the outskirts of Europe?

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